#Queens: African Diaspora Women – Esosa E.

September 3, 2017 § Leave a comment

Esosa E. performs her one-woman play at the Smithsonian Nat’l Museum of African Art

I think any black woman is a queen. It’s just, do you know it…Based on who we are and what we’ve been through and how we survive and where we stand, we are on kind of sacred ground. We stand on the backs of our ancestors.” – Ava DuVernay, Film Director

In keeping with Afrofusion TV’s mission to celebrate African diaspora people, highlight their creativity, achievements and accomplishments, we have started a new series featuring African Diaspora Women. Ms. DuVernay’s quote encapsulates the idea behind this series, which will focus on women who are making an impact in their area of professional activity –  socially and culturally – and continuing the legacy of greatness that was left by those who have passed on. In the ongoing chronicle of the progress that African descendants  have made in the diaspora, unfortunately, black women have not always gotten their due. And so we aren’t waiting, we’re celebrating.

We’re kicking it off with a feature on actor, producer, author, and raw girl vegan Esosa E. We first talked to this Nigerian-American renaissance woman back in 2014 about her role as Ngozi in the hit web series An African City; this year Esosa has been performing her one-woman play “The Woman Who Would Be King” at major DC venues after a successful showing in South Africa last year. Special thanks go the Kennedy Center Millennium Stage for allowing us to use some of their footage for this piece, and thanks a heap to Esosa for her time and for agreeing to do this feature. Check out a short promo video of our interview and watch the full feature on our website and our YouTube Channel. We’ll say no more; just be sure to follow Esosa on Instagram, Twitter, and like her page on Facebook.Watch this space for more features on dynamic African Diaspora women. Bless…

K.D. Aubert, Genevive Nnaji, Jackie Appiah among winners at The African Oscars NAFCA

September 17, 2013 § 1 Comment

Actor K. D. Aubert arrives at the Warner Theatre for the NAFCA event

Actor K. D. Aubert arrives at the Warner Theatre for the NAFCA event

On the red carpet at Washington, DC’s Warner Theatre, actress K. D. Aubert was hopeful yet confident that she would win in one of the categories at the Nollywood and African Film Critics Awards, also known as the “African Oscars.” She did win, a Best Supporting Actress award in the Diaspora Film category for the movie Turning Point, which also stars Ernie Hudson, Jackie Appiah and Todd Bridges. This was the third edition of the Award show that started in 2011 in North Carolina; this year all of the guests and patrons we spoke to were excited to be in Washington. NAFCA founder Dr. Victor Olatoye told Afrofusion TV in an earlier interview that the number of media partners had more than doubled since they first started, and he’s hoping that more funding, greater exposure, and hard work « Read the rest of this entry »

Interview: Hugh Masekela on Songs of Migration and Heritage Restoration

October 25, 2012 § 2 Comments

Hugh Masekela and Sibongile Khumalo (Photos courtesy Kennedy Center)

Listening to Hugh Masekela speak on art, music and politics would make you think he is the eternal pessimist. But that would be only when it comes to politics. The 73 year-old trumpeter, composer and singer recently performed Songs of Migration at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC together with Sibongile Khumalo and a cast of singers, dancers and musicians. He took a moment to sit down with Kwame Fitzjohn from The African World on MHz to rap about his new show, politics, mines in South Africa, and what he optimistically calls “Heritage Restoration.” Songs of Migration, produced by Sibojama Theatre and directed by James Ngcobo, is Masekela’s tribute to late 19th century migrants from all over Africa heading to work in Johannesburg’s mines. Backed by a five-piece band, it is an effervescent display of song, dance « Read the rest of this entry »

Fela! Cast Members Teach Howard University Dance Class

October 13, 2011 § 3 Comments

Do the cast members of the hit broadway musical Fela! ever get  a breather? Even while on tour with the show, many of them take time out to do work in the community. US-based Life Giver Entertainment has been sponsoring a tour of master workshops and dance classes run by some of the cast members as they go from city to city. Having just left Washington, DC, the show is now on a week-long run in Atlanta, and they are heading to Connecticut next week. Afrofusion TV was able to catch two of the cast members as they ran a workshop at Howard University’s Dance Studio in Washington, DC. As djembe drummer Talu Green kept the rhythm going with his hands, Guinean dancer and instructor Ismael Kouyaté led the class through some basic West African dance steps and sequences. Talu Green, who travelled with the Broadway cast to Nigeria this past April « Read the rest of this entry »

Celebrating African Hip Hop at the Kennedy Center

July 13, 2011 § 1 Comment

Maimouna Youssef performs with her band at the Kennedy Center

At the Kennedy Center July 12, it was an evening that music site Okayafrica called a celebration of hip hop’s new African renaissance. As part of the 10th Anniversary of the Hip Hop Theatre Festival, the show started with a “warm up” dance class led by Zimbabwean dancer Rujeko Zumbutshena (Fela!) to prep the audience for the rest of the night. She guided a fairly sizable group through hip-hop and African dance moves. Local rap star Tabi Bonney was the host of the show, and introduced Baltimore native Maimouna Youssef, an amazing grammy-nominated singer, MC and poet. Youssef got the crowd on its feet, taking them through an energetic mix of African infused hip hop and soul, « Read the rest of this entry »

Winnie The Opera: The Promo

January 7, 2011 § Leave a comment

Winnie Mandela in 2010, and right, with former husband Nelson Mandela. Photo: AFP/Getty, AP

Her Xhosa name is “Nomzamo,” meaning “Trial (having a hard time in life.)” And what a life she has had! She became the face of a defiant resistance against the racist apartheid South African government when her husband Nelson Mandela was put in prison, and her supporters still call her the “Mother of the Nation.” In 2007 she was denied a visa to enter Canada to attend an opera based on her life, entitled The Passion of Winnie. Winnie Madikizela-Mandela won’t need one this year when  Winnie The Opera opens during Freedom Week in Pretoria, South Africa, on April 28, 2011. Show producer and librettist Warren Wilensky, who was also involved in 2007’s Passion, « Read the rest of this entry »

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